Prefects implement Orange Sheet system

In order to eliminate miscommunication between students and teachers, Prefect Council implemented a new Orange Sheet system, which students will use to move a test when they have three or more on the same day, junior prefect Michael Lehrhoff ‘20 said.

Prefect Council announced the new initiative in an email to the student body Nov. 30.

To complete the form, students must collect signatures from the teachers who are administering exams to them on that day. Students may only move individual assessments that are 30 minutes or longer, and must turn in the form at least three days before the originally scheduled test.

Teachers are required to accommodate students if they turn in an Orange Sheet.

“Prefect Council chose to implement this system because it actively shows a mutual sense of empathy and respect for the struggles of students and teachers alike,” Lehrhoff said. “I hope that now teachers will not feel as rushed to write new assessments and that they will not need to hastily rearrange their schedules to accommodate for students’ conflicts. I believe that this system helps encourage students to plan ahead as well as feel reassured that teachers and the administration recognize and want to help manage students’ stress.”

Head prefect Kevin Chen ’19 wrote the form in order to simplify the process of moving tests, Lehrhoff said.
Upper School Dean Sharon Cuseo and Director of Student Affairs Jordan Church then proposed the Orange Sheet system in a Faculty Academic Committee, where it was approved.

“Before, when I wanted to move an assignment, many teachers would be hesitant to say yes,” Alex Daum ’20 said. “Since the sheets establish the rule more officially, I think more teachers will be more willing.”

On the other hand, the long process of filling out the form could possibly prevent more students from utilizing it, Elaine Liu ’20 said.

“I understand that it might make things a little bit more organized, but I don’t see a problem with just sending my teachers an email,” Liu said. “I also think that more students will be less willing to move tests, just because it is a bit of a hassle to fill it out.”

Not only does the form take more time for students to move a test, but it also may conflict with any last-minute changes to assessment dates, Sapir Levy ’20 said.

“Although I’m sure the sheet is intended to simplify the process of changing a test day, I think it complicates it because students have to find and print the forms and alert all three teachers,” Levy said. “Discussing with one teacher about moving a test is more time efficient, especially because tests or assignments may be moved at the last minute.”

Max Hahn ’21 said that he would prefer if the forms were made available electronically in order to make the process less complicated.

“I think that there should be a more accessible way to perform the same function that the Orange Sheet does,” Hahn said.

Some students believe that the system does not do enough to effectively reduce students’ stress, Lauren Morganbesser ’19 said.

“Specifically, [the sheet] doesn’t include take-home essays or quizzes, which both contribute to stress, and in my opinion should be included,” Morganbesser said. “However, it’s a worthwhile initiative, and I’m interested to see how it turns out.”

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