Saturday classes help martial artists earn black belts

During Saturday practices, Ju-jitsu students refine complex techniques that require more time than the length of a normal team practice and also learn many new techniques necessary for higher-level belts. The Saturday Ju-jitsu classes provide an opportunity for students who missed their classes on weekdays and do not want to be marked down for their lack of attendance to make up classes.

 They also allow interested students to get extra work-out sessions so that they can acquire higher belt rankings, which demand more time to qualify for than regular Tuesday and Friday meetings provide, Jordan said.

Jordan, who himself wears a black belt with five red stripes, opens up Saturday sessions to anybody who wants to come, although people outside the school have to pay a nominal fee to attend “club practices.”

The classes are attended by as few as two to three people and as many as 10 to 12. Public classes are also available from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. after Tuesday practices.

Sensei Jordan, as his students call him, has headed the Harvard-Westlake Ju-jitsu program since 1998, following the departure of the late Steve Copping, who had taught the martial art for 15 years. In his several years as coach of the Ju-jitsu team, Jordan has only had two students reach the rank of black belt: David Eckardt ’03 and Daniel Erickson ’03. Both were able to reach the rank of black belt after training since ninth grade.

Supplemental training will also allow students to further develop good character that the Japanese martial art provides.

“Shy kids open up; bullies mellow out; outsiders start to fit in and everyone learns that they have much more personal power than they ever imagined possible,” Jordan said. “It is one of the most effective methods of building self-esteem that I have ever experienced.”

During Saturday practices, Ju-jitsu students refine complex techniques that require more time than the length of a normal team practice and also learn many new techniques necessary for higher-level belts. The Saturday Ju-jitsu classes provide an opportunity for students who missed their classes on weekdays and do not want to be marked down for their lack of attendance to make up classes.

They also allow interested students to get extra work-out sessions so that they can acquire higher belt rankings, which demand more time to qualify for than regular Tuesday and Friday meetings provide, Jordan said.

Jordan, who himself wears a black belt with five red stripes, opens up Saturday sessions to anybody who wants to come, although people outside the school have to pay a nominal fee to attend “club practices.”
 
The classes are attended by as few as two to three people and as many as 10 to 12. Public classes are also available from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. after Tuesday practices.

Sensei Jordan, as his students call him, has headed the Harvard-Westlake Ju-jitsu program since 1998, following the departure of the late Steve Copping, who had taught the martial art for 15 years. In his several years as coach of the Ju-jitsu team, Jordan has only had two students reach the rank of black belt: David Eckardt ’03 and Daniel Erickson ’03. Both were able to reach the rank of black belt after training since ninth grade.

Supplemental training will also allow students to further develop good character that the Japanese martial art provides.

“Shy kids open up; bullies mellow out; outsiders start to fit in and everyone learns that they have much more personal power than they ever imagined possible,” Jordan said. “It is one of the most effective methods of building self-esteem that I have ever experienced.”

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