Engineering students showcase projects

Brandon Porter ’18 tests his pinhole camera during the Principles of Engineering open house Nov. 1. Students in the class designed cameras for people who have limited manual dexterity, and created manuals detailing their design process. Credit: Kaitlin Musante/Chronicle
Brandon Porter ’18 tests his pinhole camera during the Principles of Engineering open house Nov. 1. Students in the class designed cameras for people who have limited manual dexterity, and created manuals detailing their design process. Credit: Kaitlin Musante/Chronicle

Principles of Engineering classes displayed their handmade pinhole cameras to students and faculty Nov. 1.

Students in this class designed the pinhole cameras for people with limited manual dexterity.

To simulate the disability, students wore oven mitts while designing their own pinhole cameras.

“It was a really interesting project in general because we were designing something for a niche market, which throws in a couple more constraints.,” Principles of Engineering student Brandon Porter ’18 said. “It makes you think more.”

Each student also displayed a manual that described his or her process to visitors recreate his or her design and a collection of photos that were taken with their creation.

The class also created a timeline of the evolution of the camera, which included facts and photographs.

The timeline was displayed in the back of the classroom for visitors to view and discuss.

Principles of Engineering and science teacher Karen Hutchison said she was pleased with the end results of the project.

“I was impressed with the diversity of ideas, and the picture quality was actually very impressive,” Hutchison said.

Students, faculty and staff could stop by at any point and discuss the design of each project with its creator.

The attendees said they enjoyed the display and learning about each student’s thought process.

“I liked the exhibit because the cameras were quite interesting, and it was cool how they created them out of plain cardboard boxes,” attendee Mia Nelson ’19 said. “I think the fact that they created it for those with a disability adds meaning to their project. I was very impressed with the work.”

 

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