Annual Community Service Week takes place

Juniors+make+snack+packages+to+donate+to+The+Peoples+Concern+during+their+class+meeting.+Before+making+the+packages%2C+students+had+the+opportunity+to+learn+about+homelessness+and+the+mission+of+The+Peoples+Concern.+

Iona Lee/Chronicle

Juniors make snack packages to donate to The People’s Concern during their class meeting. Before making the packages, students had the opportunity to learn about homelessness and the mission of The People’s Concern.

Iona Lee

Community Council organized the annual community service week, where the school hosts different programs and clubs throughout campus, from November 15-18. Community service activities were planned for each grade during their class meeting times, and clubs had the option to hold service events on the Quad.

During class meeting, sophomores packaged hygiene kits for the LA Mission as a part of Community Service Week. (Iona Lee/Chronicle)

Community Council hosted different organizations based on grade levels; sophomores made hygiene kits for the LA Mission, juniors put together snack packs for The People Concern and seniors listened to speakers from the Special Olympics.

The sophomore community service day proved insightful to many such as Nuzzy Sykes ’24 who thought it was a great way to instigate change as a team.

“It’s great to see that everyone’s pitching in to help create some sort of change working together,” Sykes said. “I think it’s great that we’re reaching out to underprivileged communities in Los Angeles, and even out of [Los Angeles] too.”

Community Council member Ella Goldberg ’23 said she was excited to bring a food drive to school through her continuous involvement with The People Concern.

It’s great to see that everyone’s pitching in to help create some sort of change working together.”

— Nuzzy Sykes '24

“I have probably been [volunteering there] since I was about four years old at the shelters near my house,” said Goldberg. “I’ve done food drives like this at my elementary school, and I was really excited to be able to bring this opportunity here.”

Bear Boxes Leader Kendra Ross ’23, who had a bracelet and card-making station set up during break, said that she was excited about how the Bear Box activity went.

“I am very happy with how our Bear Boxes activity went and with the club as a whole,” said Ross. “It is wonderful to see so many people eager to help out and be involved with Bear Boxes and community service week definitely showed the generosity and lively energy of students.”

Later that week, the school hosted a seminar on the Special Olympics, an athletic training program for adults with disabilities.

Siji Smolev ’22 said that it was interesting to learn about different areas outside of the school’s environment.

“I think it serves a really important purpose in our community because it brings people awareness to the world outside of our Harvard Westlake bubble, and it inspires people to give back to the Los Angeles community that they might have grown disconnected from as high school students,” said Smolev.